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Heather Huisinga, CSI, CDT, LEED AP
Junior Member
Username: Huisinga

Post Number: 20
Registered: 05-2002
Posted on Thursday, April 24, 2003 - 03:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostPrint Post

This product just landed on my desk to be researched. I've found several websites listing this product and characteristics. Have any of you had experience with Ceramic Cover that you would like to share? Thanks!
(Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2003 - 08:38 am:   Edit PostDelete PostPrint Post

Heather,
I have no idea what kind of product this is? Can you elaborate a bit?
John_Regener (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2003 - 04:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostPrint Post

I did a quick search using Google and found a description of ceramic cover. See:

http://thermalprosystems.com/

Also do your own search of Google using "ceramic cover." There are several other websites.
Heather Huisinga, CSI, CDT, LEED AP
Member
Username: Huisinga

Post Number: 21
Registered: 05-2002
Posted on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - 10:51 am:   Edit PostDelete PostPrint Post

In addition to the website John mentioned, here are the other three that I've found useful in my research...

www.phoenixthermal.com/ceramic_cover.shtml
www.ziegler-industries.com/ZPages/new.html
www.envirorem.com/thermalinsulation.html

Here's the short description I've put together from the websites I've surfed: Ceramic-Coverô is a radiant heat barrier protective coating with insulation properties. Ceramic-Coverô provides protection from corrosion, eliminates radiant heat and in comparison testing has out performed 4 inches of R 20 foam with just a 20 mil application. Ceramic-Coverô also maintains its high tensile strength and elasticity throughout a very wide temperature range.
William C. Pegues, FCSI, CCS
Senior Member
Username: Wpegues

Post Number: 152
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - 11:12 am:   Edit PostDelete PostPrint Post

I noticed that it talks about repairs to what is coated stating that you can easily make any repairs to anything coated since all you have to do to remove the coating is scrape it off with a putty knife and put it in the trash. Then just recoat and its like new. That would make it very soft.

From a technical point of view, its pretty interesting stuff. Mostly used in the processing industry and pipeline industry for its insulation properties.
Heather Huisinga, CSI, CDT, LEED AP
Intermediate Member
Username: Huisinga

Post Number: 22
Registered: 05-2002
Posted on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - 01:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostPrint Post

I saw the same statement, William. On another website I found the following statement:

"In the event that the product needs to be removed, it can be cut and scrapped or sanded. The dust created from sanding the product is considered nuisance dust and contains no harmful material."

After reading this statement, I came to the conculsion that the statement about removing the coating with a putty knife and put it in the trash was getting at the same point.

Now I'm really interested to see what the rep will bring with him when he visits me this Friday!

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